Alzheimer’s Disease: The EARLY WARNING SIGNS & How To Reverse It | Richard Johnson & Dale Bredesen

Alzheimer’s Disease: The EARLY WARNING SIGNS & How To Reverse It | Richard Johnson & Dale Bredesen

Watch the entire exclusive video mini-series here: https://open.spotify.com/show/0n43TTkp29sm7NE0ZIkKdH?si=rGP96-Y-Qf2_1sP78F53LA and Follow Impact Theory on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/show/1nARKz2vTIOb7gC9dusE4b?si=QS-HRFCXS9ejZ6DZzLMJvA, to hear additional mental health-related content throughout the month. RESTART your life in 7 days: http://bit.ly/42KM8OR On Today’s Episode: If you think you really understand Alzheimer’s, think again!

Early detection and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease can be achieved through cognitive assessments, blood tests, and monitoring fructose intake, with a plant-rich ketogenic diet and addressing underlying causes being crucial for reversing the disease.

  • 00:00 ???? Early warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease include memory changes, executive function issues, and processing speed changes, which can be detected through cognitive assessments and MRI scans, and can be prevented through a “cognoscopy” consisting of blood tests for glucose, fructose, and inflammatory pathways, as well as avoiding excessive sugar intake and monitoring glucose levels.
    • Alzheimer’s disease, which is more deadly than COVID-19 and affects 45 million Americans, can be reversed with a protocol that slows down even normal aging, as shown in a trial published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, and the early signs of the disease include forgetting where one’s keys are.
    • Getting evaluated through a “cognoscopy” consisting of blood tests for glucose, fructose, and inflammatory pathways, as well as checking for features of metabolic syndrome and avoiding excessive sugar intake, could prevent Alzheimer’s disease in nearly all people if done at 40-45 years of age.
    • Consuming glucose, carbs, and high fructose corn syrup are risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, and monitoring glucose levels and inflammatory status through blood work can help identify early warning signs.
    • Alzheimer’s disease is related to the innate immune system and energetics, and early warning signs include changes in memory, executive function, and processing speed, which can be detected through an online cognitive assessment and MRI with volumetrics.
    • The size of certain regions of the brain can indicate early warning signs of Alzheimer’s, and Dale Bredesen’s cognoscopy testing looks for these early indicators in three basic areas, including metabolic issues.
    • Insulin resistance and high glucose levels in the brain are early warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease, which can be tested through PET scanning to measure glucose utilization, along with metabolic and other characteristics.
  • 15:11 ???? Systemic inflammation is a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, which is characterized by reduced glucose utilization and inability to produce and utilize ketones due to insulin resistance, but a low carb or ketogenic diet can help despite potentially raising uric acid levels.
    • Systemic inflammation, measured by C-reactive protein, is a major risk factor for heart disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s, and is frequently seen in people with metabolic syndrome, making it an important factor to monitor in preventing and reversing Alzheimer’s disease.
    • Alzheimer’s disease is linked to low ATP levels in neurons, which can be measured through neural exosomes to determine insulin resistance in the brain, but this test is not yet commercially available.
    • Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by reduced glucose utilization and inability to produce and utilize ketones due to insulin resistance, leading to a state of energy emergency and cognitive decline.
    • A high protein diet can raise uric acid, which can cause inflammation and gout, but on a low carb or ketogenic diet, the ketones suppress inflammation and can lead to a high uric acid level that tends to come down over several months, despite the potential risks, ketogenic diets are generally considered healthy.
    • High levels of uric acid, which can be caused by a Western diet and a lack of an enzyme to degrade it, can lead to gout, systemic inflammation, and an increased risk of heart disease, and while a low carb keto diet can help with obesity and diabetes, it can also raise uric acid levels due to ketones blocking its excretion in the kidneys.
    • High uric acid causes inflammation and pain in the wrist, and can prevent the body from getting rid of toxins.
  • 30:27 ???? A plant-rich ketogenic diet with fasting is recommended for brain health, people with apoe4 gene should focus on consuming phytonutrients and polyphenols, and fructose production in the brain triggered by high carb diets is believed to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.
    • A plant-rich ketogenic diet with appropriate periods of fasting is recommended for brain health, as a pure meat diet can lead to vascular disease and heart attacks, and the pure carnivore diet works well for people with a lot of inflammation.
    • People with the apoe4 gene, a common risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, should be careful about a carnivorous diet and focus on consuming phytonutrients and polyphenols, as they have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes and are missing important nutrients.
    • The speaker’s diet consists of 65-70% animal protein and 30-35% vegetables, they don’t touch carbs, intermittently fast for 17.5 hours, and can feel when they hit ketosis, but they don’t know their apoe status.
    • The reason why humans are more susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease than monkeys is due to a specific mutation in the apoe gene, changes in diet and exposure to mold, mycotoxins, and sugar, and the lack of intake of plants.
    • The “switch” refers to a biologic change in animals where they suddenly gain weight, become insulin resistant, and develop features of metabolic syndrome, which is triggered by inflammation and a particular diet, and is relevant to Alzheimer’s disease.
    • Fructose production in the brain, triggered by high carb diets, salt, and red meat, is believed to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease, and controlling diabetes and insulin resistance can significantly reduce the risk, while also improving mental performance, and COVID-19 patients are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s.
  • 50:36 ???? Fructose consumption can lead to hunger, leptin resistance, and decreased ATP production, which are all characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease, but treatments like acyclovir can reduce the time the brain is under assault and prevent downsizing of the brain’s network.
    • Eating a lot of fructose, found in fruit, can activate a switch that causes hunger, leptin resistance, foraging, and decreased ATP production, leading to overeating and potential health problems.
    • Fructose is the only nutrient that lowers ATP in a cell, stimulating hunger and blocking the breakdown of fat, while glucose also plays a role in insulin resistance and fructose production in the brain.
    • Fructose causes insulin resistance, inflammation, low energy, low ATP, and mitochondrial suppression in the brain, which are all characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease.
    • Foraging behavior, which involves exploratory behavior, impulsivity, and decreased self-control, is an evolutionary advantage that allows us to survive seasonal cycles, but when the switch is left on all the time, as it is with Alzheimer’s patients, it can lead to wandering and chronic stress.
    • Chronic stress, poor diet, and exposure to certain infections can activate the innate immune system, leading to Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline, but treatments like acyclovir can reduce the time the brain is under assault and prevent the downsizing of the brain’s network.
    • The brain prioritizes essential functions over forming new memories due to a mismatch in supply and demand of resources.
  • 01:10:46 ???? Reduce inflammation and fructose intake, support mitochondrial function through polyphenols, and address underlying causes to reverse Alzheimer’s disease, with new tests available for early warning signs and prevention strategies including reducing fructose intake and taking vitamin C supplements.
    • Reducing inflammation, keeping fructose low, and supporting mitochondrial function through polyphenols are critical for making and keeping new synapses and memories, as fructose may play a dominant role in Alzheimer’s and is turned on under many stressful conditions, including concussions, toxins, and COVID-19.
    • Alzheimer’s disease may be caused by excessive fructose levels in the brain, which can be reduced through various measures such as reducing high glycemic carbs and polyphenols, and the disease is characterized by a switch in the brain from a mode of building and maintenance to a protective mode, leading to a reduction in synapses and cognitive decline.
    • A protocol for reversing Alzheimer’s disease involves identifying and addressing the various drivers of the disease, such as glucose and fructose-related insults, oral hygiene, leaky gut, and exposure to mold and mycotoxins, through wearables, continuous glucose monitoring, and blood tests.
    • New tests are available to identify early warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease, including blood tests for phosphotal-181, phosphotal-217, gfap, and neurofilament light, and identifying the underlying causes of the disease, such as inflammation, atrophy, glycotoxicity, toxicity, and concussion, and addressing them through healing the gut, achieving metabolic flexibility, and eliminating pathogens.
    • To prevent microthrombi and microinfarcts that can lead to Alzheimer’s and other diseases, it is important to quiet down the innate immune system and improve metabolic flexibility by reducing fructose intake and using supplements like nattokinase and pycnogenol, as well as Omega-3s and SPM activators.
    • Cut out sugary drinks and processed foods with high fructose corn syrup, but natural fruits are fine because they contain flavonols and vitamin C, which counters some of the fructose effects, and everyone should take 500 milligrams of vitamin C twice a day to interfere with fructose.
  • 01:31:25 ???? Drinking more water and reducing salt intake can lower the risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, dementia, and aging, while Alzheimer’s disease can be improved through bioidentical hormone replacement and early detection and detoxification.
    • Drinking more water and reducing salt intake can lower serum sodium levels, which is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, dementia, and aging, and can even block obesity and diabetes by reducing fructose production.
    • To determine how much water to drink, look at the color of your urine and aim for a slightly yellow color, get a serum sodium test to ensure it’s between 138-142, and drink 8-10 glasses of water a day, but be cautious if you’re a marathon runner or considering testosterone replacement therapy.
    • Alzheimer’s disease is more prevalent in women due to the correlation between the precipitous drop in estradiol and progesterone and the energetic changes that occur, which can be traced through molecular pathways and can be improved through bioidentical hormone replacement.
    • Alzheimer’s disease is now being diagnosed in people in their 30s, 40s, and 50s due to exposure to toxins over time, which are sequestered in bones and released during menopause or perimenopause, and early detection and detoxification can help reverse it.
    • Following menopause, women’s increased uric acid levels may contribute to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other metabolic syndromes, as well as being more sensitive to the negative effects of uric acid compared to men.
    • Signaling cycles can be helpful in one circumstance but terrible in another as the brain switches from one mode to another.
  • 01:45:11 ???? Early detection and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease is key, with diet and exercise playing a crucial role in reducing fructose consumption and addressing environmental factors, according to Dr. Dale Bredesen and Dr. Richard Johnson.
    • Humans lost the enzyme uricase 15 million years ago, which allowed them to live longer and become the dominant apex predator, and this mutation occurred around the time when ancestral apes originated in Africa and global cooling began, leading to a change in their diet.
    • Research suggests that a mutation in European apes allowed them to survive during a period of starvation and may have helped them make more fat from fructose, and inhibiting uricase in lab rats showed increased sensitivity to sugar, higher blood pressure, and fatty liver even when eating the same amount of fructose, while resurrecting the extinct gene that we lost showed that human liver cells with uricase make less fat from fructose.
    • The discussion revolves around the mutation that raised uric acid to help humans survive by making more fat from fructose, and the potential side effects of developing a drug to inhibit this pathway for Alzheimer’s disease.
    • To reverse Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to identify the cause of the insult, which could be a toxin or diet, and understand that fructose production in the brain is causing low power mode, but there is hope for reversal in the early stages of the disease.
    • Early detection and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease is key, as mild cognitive impairment is a late stage of the disease, but even those with early dementia can improve with treatment, and addressing the root causes such as fructose consumption and environmental factors may be a more effective approach than targeting amyloid, according to Dr. Dale Bredesen and Dr. Richard Johnson.
    • Diet and exercise, including reducing high glycemic carbs and sugar, reducing salt, and drinking more water, are important in preventing Alzheimer’s disease, according to Dr. Richard J. Johnson.
  • 02:00:27 ???? Learn how to prevent and potentially reverse Alzheimer’s disease by subscribing to the video, as the speaker emphasizes the importance of taking control of one’s health and mentions a patient whose life has been decimated by the disease.
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